General
Hand pressurized container pumps
WE often hear that a goat will eat almost anything and the new GoatThroat pump is no exception. GoatThroat Hand-Pressurized Precision Pumps allow you to pump virtually any fluid from any type of container, from five to 200 litres – and all with no power, just a simple one-hand operation.
These one-of-a-kind pumps will handle almost any type of fluid, from acetic acid to zinc sulphate, more than 600 chemicals, food products, and even petrol easily and safely without
spills or mess. 
These pumps are so simple to use, you might never want to buy any other drum pump. If you have ever tapped a beer keg, you can install and use the GoatThroat pump in a matter of minutes. Simply screw the GoatThroat pump into your container, pump two to eight strokes (depending on container size) and you are ready to go. The average 200 litre container takes eight strokes to reach 15 psi. Once you have reached 15 psi, simply open the spigot and flow will come. Precise control is now in the palm of your hand, with flows up to 17 litres per minute and heads
to five metres.
The pumps are constructed of 100 percent non-reactive polypropylene. Seals are available in Nitrile, EPDM,
Santoprene, or Viton.
A drip-proof spigot prevents hazardous spills, and an internal pressure relief valve prevents over pressurizing the container. There’s also a manual external pressure relief valve which allows quick and safe discharge of pressure. 
Each GoatThroat includes the pump, drum seals (three sizes), four siphon tube sections, three tube connectors, and one
foot piece.
Publishing Information
Page Number:
1
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